Saturday, June 6, 2015

Book review | The Mapmaker's Children | Sarah McCoy

I recently finished reading The Mapmaker's Children by Sarah McCoy. Based loosely on the story of Sarah Brown, daughter of abolitionist John Brown, it is a fascinating story of two women whose lives are connected across more than a century of time.

In alternating chapters of story-telling, McCoy tells the stories of Sarah and Eden, two women whose lives are both impacted by fertility struggles. Both women are, unknowingly at times, on a quest to redefine themselves as women with a major part of womanhood taken away from them. One by disease and one one for unknown reasons.

I am a reader, this is without a doubt. However, I am a reader who reads primarily for escapism. So much of my day is about reading to learn. At work where I guide students in how to do that, and at home, where I am teaching my own children to love words and their meanings. Add to that my constant need to take classes (June 15th my new courses start!) I am reading to learn all day long.  So when I pick up a book for myself, it is usually for escapism. That was my plan when I picked up this book to read.

BUT.

This book made me want to learn more. I constantly had my phone in hand looking up things like "john brown" and "sarah brown" to see how much of this story was fact and how much was fiction.

*If* I had to say something negative, I would say that I would have liked a bit more substance to the closing of Eden's storyline, a deeper glimpse into where the future takes her.  But even without it, I am just able to wonder and imagine more.

It was a fascinating journey through the lives of two women searching for themselves, their purpose, and their defintions of motherhood.

I dislike rating things on scales, so I won't give x out x stars or anything, but I do encourage anyone looking for a thought-provoking read that is simultaneously entertaining and educational to grab their nearest copy of The Mapmaker's Children.

I received a free copy of this book for review purposes from bloggingforbooks.com.

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